Our mission here at Skynet Today is broadly to make understanding of AI more accessible. This involves more than just understanding the technical concepts of AI, but also means understanding how AI techniques get developed. The process of AI research is far more incremental and slow than the big milestones of the last several years may indicate. The basic unit of research is the paper, which is a summary of a single or a couple of new ideas and results, as Wikipedia nicely summarizes:

“In academic publishing, a paper is an academic work that is usually published in an academic journal [or conference]. It contains original research results or reviews existing results … A paper may undergo a series of reviews, revisions, and re-submissions before finally being accepted or rejected for publication. This process typically takes several months.”

In AI, the majority of papers are submitted to conferences:

“An academic conference or symposium is a conference for researchers (not necessarily academics) to present and discuss their work. Together with academic or scientific journals, conferences provide an important channel for exchange of information between researchers.”

And so we get to this article’s topic: the Robotics Science and Systems Conference, one of the top conferences in robotics. I happened to attend this event, and decided to record the experience for the benefit of AI-researchers and non-researchers alike:

Hopefully, this video makes the world of AI a little less mysterious for those not in it!

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